Installing WordPress on Aplus.net

If you are not here via Googling the phrase “I can’t f&*#ing install WordPress on Aplus.net WHY GOD WHY,” you should probably skip this post, because it is filled with technical jargon (and many occurrences of the word “shit”) that you will not care about. However, since there is nothing else on the web with help for this question that I could find, I’m going to write it in the hopes that it will save some of you the heartache that I had to go through to get it to work.

1. Don’t use Aplus.net’s WordPress application. It sucks. Once you have it installed, the files are all willy-nilly and messed up and you can update neither automatically, nor manually. It’s– in a word– shit. Don’t do it.

This is a screenshot of Aplus.net's shitty WordPress installer. Avoid it.

2. Create a database. Click MySQL Database Manager in Aplus.net.

If you don’t already have a database created, you’ll need to first click Add User and follow the prompts and then select the User Name and click Add Database. Don’t worry that you can’t control what these are named. It’s all part of Aplus.net’s special charm. (Read: shit.)

When you’re finished, you’ll have something that looks like this:

Don’t close that window. You’ll need it later.

3. Install WordPress manually. This is going to involve you finding out your FTP username and password, a feat which is harder than you may assume in Aplus.net. (They win again.) In the top row, go to Web Hosting, then FTP Accounts.

Then click Details next to the FTP account you want to use.

This should get you the info you need.

Now, download an FTP client of your choice. I like FileZilla. While you’re downloading and installing that, you might as well download the lastest WordPress version and unzip it.

Once downloaded and installed, put your FTP info in your FTP client and connect. Decide where you want to put your WordPress files (whether in your root directory or in a different directory) and upload the whole shebang.

4. Create your wp-config.php file. This is where things get interesting. Aplus.net has no documentation on this because they want you to use their shitty WordPress application. Again, don’t do that. Here’s how to create a wp-config.php file for use with Aplus.net:

Open the wp-config-sample.php file that came in the WordPress installation folder. You’re going to need to edit these values:

// ** MySQL settings – You can get this info from your web host ** //
/** The name of the database for WordPress */
define(‘DB_NAME’, ‘putyourdbnamehere’);

/** MySQL database username */
define(‘DB_USER’, ‘usernamehere’);

/** MySQL database password */
define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, ‘yourpasswordhere’);

/** MySQL hostname */
define(‘DB_HOST’, ‘localhost’);

Here’s how to find the values to put in these spots…

DB_NAME: On that window I told you to keep open, look at your Databases list and get the Database Name from the left column.

DB_USER: On that window I told you to keep open, look at your Users list and get the User Name from the left column.

DB_PASSWORD: Use the password you created for your User. (If you’ve forgotten it, you can create a new one by clicking the gear next to your user name on that page I told you to keep open and entering a new password.)

DB_HOST: You can’t leave this as ‘localhost.’ Hooray for Aplus.net. To find what to put in here, on that window I told you to keep open, look at your Users list and get the DB Host from the right column.

When you’re done, you should have something that looks similar to this:

** MySQL settings – You can get this info from your web host ** //
/** The name of the database for WordPress */
define(‘DB_NAME’, ‘wp_lalala_site_aplus_net’);

/** MySQL database username */
define(‘DB_USER’, ‘myusername289326’);

/** MySQL database password */
define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, ‘stinkyfeet3000’);

/** MySQL hostname */
define(‘DB_HOST’, ‘sql5c40f.carrierzone.com’);

Save the file as wp-config.php and upload it.

5. Finish configuring in your browser. Go to your URL and WordPress will guide you through the final steps, which are comparative pieces of freaking cake. Tada! You’re done. Finally.

In conclusion, Aplus.net is shit, but you can still get WordPress to work on it.